Christie + Co

Essential reading for education companies worldwide
 
 
Remember me:
Skip Navigation LinksEI article
Coalition's school reforms will have "little impact" on standards, new book argues

The coalition's education reforms will have "little quantifiable impact" on the quality of England's schools because they don't go far enough, a new book has argued.
 
'Incentivising excellence: school choice and education quality', written by researcher Gabriel Sahlgren, calls on the government to take more radical steps to give schools more autonomy, increase competition, and allow for-profit providers into the market.
 
The book was published this week by the Centre for Market Reform in Education.
 
The pro-market think tank’s director James Croft was critical of the British government’s record of school reform, arguing that its policies to date had been "hampered by a combination of insufficient autonomy for schools to experiment and differentiate themselves from the competition; inadequate incentives for schools to expand and replicate their successes; and constraints on parents’ ability to make informed choices about which school is right for their child". 
 
Launching the book this week, Sahlgren said that school choice should improve standards in three ways: by allowing better matching between pupil and school; creating incentives to innovate; and driving schools to compete against one another.
 
In England, though, school choice has yet to have any significant impact, because it remains difficult both to set up new schools and to close existing poorly performing ones. 
 
The lack of information on school quality is also a factor, Sahlgren said, pointing to the fact that "league tables measure pupil ability, not school performance". 
 
The book lays out a number of proposals to address these problems. These include:
 
A universal voucher system, covering private as well as state schools. This would differentiate funding by pupil's wealth and ability, to prevent ‘cream skimming’;
 
A less regulated free school programme, in which applicants need only to meet basic standards, and private providers can run schools for a profit. State capital funding would be provided only in "exceptional circumstances";
 
Performance-related funding, to reward successful schools, and a willingness to close failing ones;
 
Improvements in metrics measuring school quality, taking pupil background and ability into account. Such information could be collected and published by the private sector.
 
An expansion of online learning, to provide a cheaper route to creating new school places.
 
CMRE is a new education research and policy unit, which describes its purpose as "exploring the benefits of more diverse, competitive and entrepreneurial provision in the education sector, and the feasibility of market-led solutions to public policy issues".


Posted on: 12/04/2013




Latest news

25/05/2017
Software services provider IRIS Software Group has acquired cloud education technology platform Results Squared for an undisclosed amount.
24/05/2017
International K12 operator GEMS has combined forces with Canadian data and loyalty analytics company Aimia to develop “the region’s first education-related rewards and benefits programme”.
24/05/2017
The formative assessment app Zzish created by ex-Google product manager, Charles Wiles, has raised over a £1 million from private investors on Crowdcube. Once the funding round is closed it will take the firm’s total raise to £3 million since its launch.
22/05/2017
Indian media company HT Media is acquiring Apollo Global Singapore’s 49% stake in its joint venture India Education Services Private Limited (IESPL) for Rs 58 crore (£6.89 million), DealStreetAsia has published.
18/05/2017
Singapore-based private equity advisory firm, Rising Tide Asia, part of the Rising Tide Foundation Group is in the process of selling its education assets EducationInvestor can reveal.
18/05/2017
The Conservative Party has pledged an extra £4 billion by 2022 per year to address the schools funding gap.
18/05/2017
GK Strategy, the political advisory firm, has appointed former cabinet minister and Liberal Democrat MP David Laws as a strategic advisor.
17/05/2017
The British Educational Suppliers Association (BESA) has launched a campaign to highlight the funding gap in UK schools over the past two years.
17/05/2017
Dubai-based education company GEMS Education has announced a strategic partnership with Intelligent Partners, a consultancy which offers career and higher education counselling
16/05/2017
Indian ed tech app Byju’s is in advanced talks to acquire parts of TutorVista from Pearson, Indian daily The Economic Times has reported.





global | IFC

The private sector arm of the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation, is one of the largest global investors in education. Kirsten Noben talks to head of education, Salah-Eddine Kandri, about its strategy
Read more...


Christie + Co

EducationInvestor Global events

Features and analysis

It is critical that academic institutions begin to adopt a sustainable model for the provision of online learning, says Jeremy Bradley, executive director of academic and student affairs at InterActive

Sky School offers blended learning for refugees in Jordan and Greece. We spoke to founders Mia Eskelund and Polly Akhurst

Patrick Craven, director at City & Guilds and vice-chairman of The e-Assessment Association, reviews the potential benefits of technology-enhanced assessment

VitalSource provides e-textbook services to global markets. John Donovan, newly appointed managing director for the EMEA and Asia Pacific region, tells us more

GEMS Education is one of the largest K12 operators globally. Kirsten Noben speaks to executive director of Europe, Jay Varkey, about the firm’s success

Indonesia presents a number of challenges to the informed investor, says Tony Mitchener, management consultant and national director at Australia Indonesia Business Council

The private sector arm of the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation, is one of the largest global investors in education. Kirsten Noben talks to head of education, Salah-Eddine Kandri, about its strategy

Success at Witherslack Group has been driven by a focus on high acuity cases and a substantial support structure for teachers, finds Ploy Radford

Deloitte