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Laws and Truss in, Teather and Loughton out

Former Liberal Democrat schools spokesman David Laws has been appointed a junior education minister in today's reshuffle.
Laws, who in 2010 was briefly chief secretary to the Treasury. He will serve as joint minister of state in both the Department for Education and the Cabinet Office.
Also joining the education team is Conservative Liz Truss, former deputy director of the thinktank Reform, who becomes early years minister. 
Michael Gove will remain in post as education secretary.
Children's minister Sarah Teather, however, is leaving government to concentrate on defending her seat. Tim Loughton is also standing down, tweeting: "Regret 2 report after 7 yrs Shadow Minister and 2 as Minister 4 Children PM asked me 2 stand down-good luck 2 successor in this vital role."
Laws, the co-editor of the Liberal Democrats' Orange Book, is seen as on the right of his party, and is likely to support much of Gove's agenda.
As the party's schools spokesman, he was the architect of the pupil premium policy of giving extra money to schools that teach poorer children. The party's 2010 manifesto also advocated replacing the National Curriculum with a "minimimum curriculum entitlement", and to incorporate GCSEs, A-levels and vocational qualifications into “general diploma”.
Laws served as Chief Secretary to the Treasury for less than three weeks, before being forced after breaking the rules on MPs' expenses.

Posted on: 04/09/2012

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