Christie + Co


 
 
Remember me:
Skip Navigation LinksEI article
Bellevue Education continues empire building

Private schools group Bellevue Education has tripled the number of schools it owns over the last year.
 
In summer 2011, the Surrey-based group owned just three schools, in London, Surrey and East Sussex. Since then, however, it has acquired or established another six.
 
After acquiring three schools last autumn, the group acquired Gateway School, in Missenden, Buckinghamshire, in January this year. 
 
It's also acquired two English-language boarding schools in Switzerland: Gstaad International and Surval Mont-Fleuri International.
 
This September Bellevue also founded a new private school in south west London, the non-selective Wandsworth Preparatory. The school is currently teaching a reception class only, but plans to expand to include another six year groups, for children aged up to 11, next year.
 
Bellevue's most recent set of accounts show that, in the year to 31 August 2011, it had profits of £1.5 million on turnover of £3.7 million. In the year to that date the group's total assets grew by more than 150%, from £5.2 million to £13.3 million.
 
Chief executive Mark Malley founded the firm in 2003, and still owns nearly 35% of its equity. The group adopted the name Bellevue last autumn, having previously been known as House Education and the Really Great Education Company.
 
Bellevue lists Plato One Ltd as its other major shareholder.


Posted on: 22/10/2012




Latest news

08/02/2016
Struggling for-profit college group Apollo Education has announced it will be taken private by a consortium in a deal valued at $1.1 billion (£763 million).
08/02/2016
More than a third of all primary and secondary pupils in Australia attend independent schools , a proportion that is growing, research by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has claimed.
08/02/2016
The University and College Union (UCU) has criticised more than 20 universities for refusing to publish the salaries of senior staff, calling them the “least transparent” in Britain.
08/02/2016
Improvement in UK state schools could end up putting private schools out of business, the Good Schools Guide has claimed.
08/02/2016
Astrum, the private sixth-form college group, is seeking a new chief executive after Glen Hawkins said he planned to retire.
05/02/2016
Some 350 international students at the London School of Business and Finance (LSBF) must leave the UK by the end of March, the Home Office has said.
05/02/2016
Schools group Nord Anglia Education is to develop a new international school in Abu Dhabi.
05/02/2016
Lincoln College has closed two education establishments it ran on behalf of the Saudi Arabian government, citing a lack of student demand.
04/02/2016
Educational tour operator Inspiring Learning has hired DC Advisory to sell the business within the first half of the year, EducationInvestor understands.
04/02/2016
Dutch distributor of education content Van Dijk Educatie is on the block, EducationInvestor can reveal.



Christie + Co

Features and analysis

As director of innovation, Henry Warren has been tasked with ensuring Pearson continues to innovate. He tells EducationInvestor about his plans.

TreePress makes it easier for schools to find new plays for their pupils to perform. Managing director Laura Fisher tells us more.

With investment in US ed-tech at an all-time high, how can cash-strapped European start-ups get a piece of the action? Kirsten Noben investigates.

Having educated himself using ‘flipped learning’, Jim Latrache wants to take the concept to some of the world’s poorest regions. But can the Equal Learning CEO convince investors to back him, asks Daniel Thomas.

After years falling enrolments, US for-profit college giant Apollo Education has put itself on the block. But will it be enough to turn its fortunes around, asks Daniel Thomas.

Blackboard chief executive Jay Bhatt stepped down in January, months after it was reported the firm was seeking new owners. Did he jump or was the writing on the wall, asks Kirsten Noben.

Efforts to make schools across America adhere to a common set of standards in maths and English have met with fierce resistance in some states. Could the US Presidential election end up derailing the ‘Common Core’, asks Julian Hall.

2016 could prove to be a year of increased investment in the nursery sector, with further clarity in funding stoking renewed interest, argues Arun Kanwar.



o